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There is talk of extending the Town Twinning initiative.   Japan has been suggested.   counterbalance would like to suggest Zimbabwe.

Republic of Zimbabwe

Banana Republic of Fylde

         Zimbabwe Flag               Robert Mugabe

            Fylde flag               John Coombes

Zimbabwe is a failed state. Fylde is a failed Council
It is run by Robert Mugabe, its leader who has run Zimbabwe since 1980, and still refuses to yield any power. It is run by John Coombes, its leader who has run Fylde since 2003, and who still refuses to yield any power
After taking power, he instituted wholesale land reform, taking from white landowners and giving it to his supporters. This was called compulsory land redistribution. After taking power, he instituted wholesale land disposals, taking land from public use to build a white elephant ivory tower for his employees. This was called the 'Accommodation Project'
The elephants are grey The elephants are white
Zimbabwe is a semi-presidential republic, which has a parliamentary government. Under constitutional changes in 2005, an upper chamber, (the Senate), was reinstated. The 'House of Assembly' is the lower chamber of Parliament. Fylde is a semi-dictatorship which has all its decisions except the 'budget framework' made either by a hand selected seven- man ruling junta called a 'Cabinet' or by individuals. The power formerly enjoyed by the Council to oversee all decisions of lower echelons has all but been removed.
There have been defections by MPs and individuals who are disillusioned. There has been defections of previously independent Councillors.
President Robert Mugabe's 'Zimbabwe African National Union - Patriotic Front' (commonly abbreviated ZANU-PF) has been the dominant political party in Zimbabwe since independence. Leader John Coombes' Conservative Party (Often abbreviated to CONS) has been the dominant political party in Fylde since its election.
 
In 1987 Mugabe revised the constitution and made himself president. In 2005 Coombes revised the organisation of the Council, and made himself Leader. He changes his constitution regularly, (whenever it won't let him do what he wants).
The 2005 Zimbabwe elections were held amid multiple claims of vote rigging, election fraud and intimidation. Jonathan Moyo participated in the elections despite the allegations, and won a seat as an independent member of Parliament. The 2005 elections saw Leader Coombes stand for election in Wigan and fail to get elected. It also saw him attack Barbara Pagett for failing to vote according to his whip. She stood as an independent and was elected as in independent councillor
The MDC was split into two factions. One faction (MDC-M), now led by Arthur Mutambara contested the elections to the Senate, while the other, led by Morgan Tsvangirai, was opposed to contesting the elections, stating that participation in a rigged election is tantamount to endorsing Mugabe's claim that past elections were free and fair. However, the opposition parties have now resumed participation The independents split into two factions. One faction led by Liz Oades became a formal opposition and tried to work with the Conservatives, while the other - Paul Hayhurst was opposed to the principle of a formal 'opposition' - arguing that it legitimised and endorsed the awful Cabinet system. However, an official opposition was created and has tried to participate. (See below)
In 2008, a power-sharing agreement, between Mugabe and Tsvangirai was reached, in which, while Mugabe remained president, Tsvangirai will become prime minister. However, due to ministerial differences between their respective political parties, the agreement was not fully implemented until 2009. In 2008, a power-sharing agreement between Coombes and Oades was reached. In this, while Coombes remained leader, Oades became leader of the 'opposition'. However, due to differences between their groups, the agreement was not fully implemented at all. There has been no power sharing, and today the cracks are ever widening in this supposed sharing of power
In November, 2008, the government of Zimbabwe spent $7.3 million donated by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. A representative of the organization declined to speculate on how the money was spent, except that it was not for the intended purpose, and the government has failed to honour requests to return the money In November 2008 Fylde stopped being a debt-free Council having borrowed £1.6 million last year and declaring a potential loss of £1.2 million this year. A huge financial black hole opened up and swallowed both Fylde's Swimming pools. The Council froze all its assets and its spending, and declared a state of emergency on spending. No one knew why.
There are widespread reports of systematic and escalating violations of human rights in Zimbabwe under the Mugabe administration and his party, ZANU-PF There are widespread reports of systematic and escalating violations of the Code of conduct in Fylde. After unsatisfactory conduct, the National Standards Board is now overseeing all the decisions of the Fylde Standards Committee.
The Zimbabwean government suppresses freedom of the press and freedom of speech. It has also been repeatedly accused of using the public broadcaster, the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation, as a propaganda tool. Newspapers critical of the government, such as the Daily News, closed after bombs exploded at their offices and the government refused to renew their license. The Fylde Conservatives suppress the freedom of speech for its staff and elected councillors. Only official spokesmen can speak with the media, and all press statements have to be sent via the central press unit in Blackpool and conform with the approved media policy. It repeatedly uses spin doctors as a propaganda tool and even produces its own newspaper. Some critics have been threatened with legal action.
The economy declined from 2000. The government of Zimbabwe faces a variety of economic problems after having abandoned earlier efforts to develop a market-oriented economy. The economy has declined since 2003. The governance of Fylde faces a variety of economic problems after having abandoned several previous attempts to create the 'Accommodation Project. (A new Town Hall).
Problems include a shortage of foreign exchange, soaring inflation, and supply shortages. Problems include a shortage of tourist income, soaring deficits and  common sense shortages.
Zimbabwe's involvement from 1998 to 2002 in the war in the Democratic Republic of the Congo drained hundreds of millions of dollars from the economy. Fylde's involvement in the Wyre Refuse Contract, the Streetscene debacle, and the Accommodation fiasco drained millions of Pounds from Fylde's coffers
The downward spiral of the economy has been attributed mainly to mismanagement and corruption of the Mugabe regime and the eviction of more than 4,000 white farmers in the controversial land redistribution of 2000. The downward spiral of the finances and reserves has been mainly attributed to financial mismanagement and corrupt logic in the Coombes regime, and the removal of Councillors with experience.
This has also resulted in Zimbabwe, previously an exporter of maize, becoming a net importer. Tobacco exports have also declined sharply. This has also resulted in Fylde, previously being debt free, now running cap in hand to borrow money for day to day spending.
The Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force said 60% of Zimbabwe's wildlife has died since 2000. The report warns that the loss of life combined with widespread deforestation is potentially disastrous for the tourist industry. Many environmental groups have said there will be huge loss of biodiversity and wildlife if Coombes' building plans go through on green field sites in Fylde. It would be bad for the 'Green Tourism' initiative as well.
Inflation rose from an annual rate of 32% in 1998 to an official estimated high of 231,000,000% in July 2008 according to the country's Central Statistical Office. This represented a state of hyperinflation, and the central bank introduced a new 100 billion dollar note. Financial incompetence rose to new heights in 2009 when Fylde capitalised £705,000 worth of day to day spending, borrowed over the next 25 years to cover it, and injected it into the previous years accounts, so its reserves could stay above the level that would probably have triggered a takeover by an external financial body
Local residents have largely resorted to buying essentials from neighbouring Botswana, South Africa and Zambia. Local residents have just about abandoned all hope and are now simply waiting for the next election.
In 2005, the government started making overtures that white farmers could come back, but much of the land that had been confiscated was no longer productive. In 2009, Fylde started making overtures that it would reopen the swimming pools, but much of the equipment and infrastructure was damaged and no longer productive
In January 2007, the government even let some white farmers sign long term leases. But, the government reversed course again and started demanding that all remaining white farmers leave the country or face jail. In 2009 Fylde advertised its pools for tender and showed some pool operators round, but despite 8 or more 'expressions of interest' it extend the deadline for offers to be sent in by another month, then by yet another month.
The labour market is highly regulated; hiring a worker is cumbersome, firing a worker is difficult, and unemployment has risen to 80 % 2005 The labour market is highly regulated at Fylde, hiring a worker is cumbersome, firing a worker is difficult, (But mostly, the apparently troublesome ones get a payoff) and redundancies have risen sharply
Since 2000 president Mugabe has confiscated lands of white farmers, and this former net exporter of grain has now been plagued by hunger. The country has a high level of corruption. Since 2009 Leader John Coombes has farmed out as many council services as possible, and this former net exporter of its talent (to Namibia and elsewhere) now has to import services from Blackpool, Preston and Wyre.
Zimbabwe is now in a terrible state. The economy has all but collapsed. There is widespread famine, which has been cynically manipulated by the government so the opposition strongholds suffer the most. Fylde is now in a terrible state. The finances had all but collapsed. There is widespread use of special expenses which have been cynically manipulated so opposition strongholds such as Elswick and Kirkham suffer the most.
Under the terms of the 1980 constitution, executive power is formally vested in the president, consulted by a prime minister, who, in reality, wields most power. He, in turn, is advised by a cabinet, which is responsible to the  parliament, which wields all legislative authority. This consists of a House of Assembly, with 150 members, of whom 120 are elected by universal adult suffrage, 12 are nominated by the president, 10 are traditional chiefs and eight are provincial governors. Under the terms of the 2005 reorganisation, executive power is formally vested in the Chief Executive, consulted by a Leader, who, in reality, wields most power. He, in turn, is supported by a cabinet, which is responsible to no-one but itself, and which wields almost all legislative authority. The House of Assembly known as a Council has 51 members, all of whom are still elected by the public - but don't hold your breath.
Although Zimbabwe is better developed than many of its neighbours (especially as regards basic infrastructure such as roads, telecommunications, water and electricity), much of this benefit has been squandered or allowed to disintegrate through neglect. Although Fylde is less deprived than many of its neighbours (especially as regards basic infrastructure such as attractive parks and gardens, civility, manners and finance), much of this benefit has been squandered or allowed to disintegrate through neglect.
Harare Airport is 9 miles southeast of the city. To/from the airport: Coaches run at regular intervals Taxis are available. Facilities: Post office, restaurant, duty-free shop and bank/bureau de change. Blackpool Airport is two miles northwest of St Annes. Buses run at regular intervals. Taxis are available. Post offices are closing, as are the attractions like 'Tiggis' and 'The Island'.
Travellers are advised against all travel to high density, low-income suburban areas at any time and against all but essential travel to rural Mashonaland and farming areas. Travellers are advised against all travel to high density, low-income suburban areas outside the Borough, and against all but essential travel to Blackpool at night.
There is a risk of arbitrary detention or arrest and a significant increase in the number of roadblocks, including those manned by armed officers, making road travel more dangerous. There is a risk of an arbitrary fixed penalty fine for overstaying a parking time or not having your dog on a lead, and a significant increase in the number of CCTV cameras, including those manned by officers, is likely to make visiting the area more costly.
In Zimbabwe, to reduce the chances of the opposition winning elections, the police harrass and arrest opposition members and their supporters In Fylde,  to reduce the chances of the opposition winning elections, The Commissar wants to reduce the number of Councillors that can stand for election in each ward. The police have not harassed or arrested any opposition members - at least not yet.
Sourced mostly from Wikipedia whose content is acknowledged Dated:  30 October 2009.

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